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Dr. Ravi Jagasia

 
 

Dr. Ravi Jagasia
F.Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd
CNS Discovery
Grenzacherstrasse
CH-4070 Basel/Switzerland

 
E-mail ravi.jagasia@roche.com
Phone +41 61 687 11 74
 
Homepage
 
 

Dr. Jagasia is a laboratory head of the Human Neural Stem Cell Lab and project leader for small molecule drug discovery programs for: 1) neuroregenerative therapy for Alzheimer’s; 2) disease modifying therapy for Autism Spectrum Disorders; and 3) disease modifying therapy for Parkinson’s. The focus of his laboratory has been to develop protocols to differentiate physiologically relevant neurons, development of several phenotypic screens (High Throughput and High Content Screening, HTS/HCS) and to establish novel technologies at Roche (eg. genome editing, ribosomal profiling, human pluripotent stem cells etc).

Prior to joining Roche in his current role, Dr. Jagasia did a postdoc at the Helmholtz Zentrum in München focused on models of CNS neuroregeneration (maturation of newborn granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus) and neurodegeneration of the nervous system (in vivo model for astrocyte induced mitochondrial dysfunction). During his PhD at the Max-Planck Institute fur Neurobiologie in Martinsried, Dr. Jagasia demonstrated the importance of mitochondrial proteins in developmental programmed cell death in vivo.

Dr. Jagasia holds a PhD in from the Adolf-Butenandt-Institut für Physiologische Chemie at the Ludwig-Maximilians Universität in München, and a Master ’s and Bachelor’s of Science from the University of Toronto Department of Physiology.

For additional details, see http://www.roche.com/


Recent publications related to stem cells

  • Karalay O, Doberauer K, Vadodaria KC, Knobloch M, Berti L, Miquelajauregui A, Schwark M, Jagasia R, Taketo MM, Tarabykin V, Lie DC, Jessberger S. (2011). Prospero-related homeobox 1 gene (Prox1) is regulated by canonical Wnt signaling and has a stage-specific role in adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108:5807-12.
     
  • Aigner S, Heckel T, Zhang JD, Andreae LC, Jagasia R. (2014). Human pluripotent stem cell models of autism spectrum disorder: emerging frontiers, opportunities, and challenges towards neuronal networks in a dish. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 231:1089-104.
     
  • Steib K, Schäffner I, Jagasia R, Ebert B, Lie DC. (2014). Mitochondria modify exercise-induced development of stem cell-derived neurons in the adult brain. J Neurosci. 34:6624-33.
     
  • Dunkley T, Costa V, Friedlein A, Lugert S, Aigner S, Ebeling M, Miller MT, Patsch C, Piraino P, Cutler P, Jagasia R. (2015). Characterization of a human pluripotent stem cell-derived model of neuronal development using multiplexed targeted proteomics. Proteomics Clin Appl. 9:684-94.
     
  • Costa V, Lugert S, Jagasia R. (2015). Role of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in cognition in physiology and disease: pharmacological targets and biomarkers. Handb Exp Pharmacol. 228:99-155.
     
  • Patsch C, Challet-Meylan L, Thoma EC, Urich E, Heckel T, O'Sullivan JF, Grainger SJ, Kapp FG, Sun L, Christensen K, Xia Y, Florido MH, He W, Pan W, Prummer M, Warren CR, Jakob-Roetne R, Certa U, Jagasia R, Freskgård PO, Adatto I, Kling D, Huang P, Zon LI, Chaikof EL, Gerszten RE, Graf M, Iacone R, Cowan CA. (2015). Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells. Nat Cell Biol. 17:994-1003.
     
  • Costa V, Aigner S, Vukcevic M, Sauter E, Behr K, Ebeling M, Dunkley T, Friedlein A, Zoffmann S, Meyer CA, Knoflach F, Lugert S, Patsch C, Fjeldskaar F, Chicha-Gaudimier L, Kiialainen A, Piraino P, Bedoucha M, Graf M, Jessberger S, Ghosh A, Bischofberger J, Jagasia R. (2016). mTORC1 Inhibition Corrects Neurodevelopmental and Synaptic Alterations in a Human Stem Cell Model of Tuberous Sclerosis. Cell Rep. 15:86-95.


Reviews

  • Aigner S, Heckel T, Zhang JD, Andreae LC, Jagasia R. (2014). Human pluripotent stem cell models of autism spectrum disorder: emerging frontiers, opportunities, and challenges towards neuronal networks in a dish. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 231:1089-104.